Go On: Hermit

Recently, I had the opportunity to re-photograph this painting from 2001.  It is called Go On: Hermit, and is approximately 12″ x 10″.  There are many themes persistent in my work which had their genesis in this particular painting.  I hope that you enjoy being able to see it in greater detail and clarity than has been available previously.

Go On Askesis Version3 Go On Askesis Version9 Go On Askesis Version6 Go On Askesis Version4 Go On Askesis Version8 Go On Askesis Version10 Go On Askesis Version5

13 Comments on “Go On: Hermit

    • Thank you, Bev. I have always held a deep appreciation for the work of the miniature painters of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in Northern Europe, and the intimacy and vision that their work lends itself to. I have tried to honor their influence in my own small way:)

  1. I have to pause for a moment Jack….having just taken a tour through your body of work.( The paintings are an entirely new experience for me…I must have been introduced to your work through Obed Edom and your engravings) And I look at this term…”body of work” and think how accurate it is. This is your body and blood, isn’t it. I try not to hold my breath through the weight and depth of your vision, but it’s a familiar weight, even if seen through a different lens. Maybe I should have taken the tour more slowly…LOL…or waited to comment until my microbes and molecules had settled down a bit.

    What an extraordinary way to start the day! But Jack….can you tell us what the hermit is holding?

    • Jana, your insight is really striking to me- especially right now- about the work being my body and blood. I can’t deny that it is in a way. It means a lot that you took the time to look and see. It takes time and it means a lot.

      The hermit is holding a kind of astrolabe-mobile. The planets have no strings!

      I hope that your microbes have recovered.

  2. I am seeing a collision of late medieval religious art with American regionalist mural painting exploding into a timeless vision-quest uniquely yours. Beautiful work!

    • You see it well, Steven. I have always seen the late medieval and renaissance influences, but it is true that John Stuart Curry is in there too. Thank you for your insights.

      • And perhaps more importantly is where you take us… in this confluence…of originality. Old ideas made new in your hands.

  3. Reblogged this on metaloplastyka Angus and commented:
    Mój koelga z USA, Jack Baumgartner ma wiele talentów. To prawdziwa przyjemnosć ogladać jego prace na jego blogu, do czego zachęcam! * My friend in United States, Jack Baumgartner is an multi talented guy. It’s a real pleasure to watch his works on his blog, i insure you. Let’s watch!

  4. Man, do I love this painting! Great to revisit it. Thanks for sharing it.

  5. Magnificent. You have studied the sources, and while honouring them, have re-worked them into something entirely your own. I too start back there in the early renaissance, the fount of all I aspire to.

    Handsomely done, Jack, and heartfelt.

    • Thank you so much, Clive. I am glad that you have seen this painting. I am grateful too that you see so clearly the origins of much of my work. I too can see that connection in your work, though maybe more spatially distant, the spirit is quite near. Funny it is, how I still see so much of the world through my renaissance lens.

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