A new print and BAUMWERKSHOP, our new online store

A Witness, the Heavenly Counsel, 2018 linocut print by Jack Baumgartner

Baumwerkshop

Marketing my work has always been precarious territory for me.  At a fundamental level, I am much more interested in making my work than trying to sell it.  Philosophically and morally, I struggle with the slippery slope of salesmanship and authenticity.  Authenticity as a word has already been pretty much trashed by our cultural trend towards filtered-authenticity in order to generate likes and sell products.  I am certainly guilty of it, myself.  Likes are addictive.  But it all leaves me with a bitter taste in my mouth.  It is hard to not feel like marketing breeds a certain level of dishonesty that we have decided to be ok with as a society. 

Usually my work is both deeply personal and (I hope) deeply spiritual.  I struggle often with the feeling that I am prostituting both myself and the things of God when I set out to peddle these visual representations in the marketplace.  I don’t really have a satisfying resolution for this uncomfortable feeling, except for the opposing weight of the reactions of “my” audience, expressing a desire to share in these things.   

do want to sell my work and provide an income for my family and finance future projects.  It is a part of life and a part of growing, of being fruitful.  It is part of work, which is a divine invitation.

I have a calling to make art and what I hope are beautiful objects, and useful pieces of furniture.  I have a calling to make that work accessible to the culture I am a part of.  I want to try to do that in as straightforward a way as I know how.  This new web store is an effort to do that. 

You can get to the store by going to https://baumwerkshop.com, or you can select the menu of this sight and click on “Purchase Work“.  I really do hope that you will visit and let me know what you think.  I also really hope that you might purchase something, if you see something you like.  There should be some exciting new things showing up there in the coming weeks.

Thank you, for supporting me and following along on this journey.  God is good.

  • Jack

    

Go On, David Bridgeman

Go On, David Bridgeman

The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’  Matthew 25:40 NIV

He came to see me when I was on the margins, lonely and far away and he celebrated the paintings and the puppets I made.  He was not a common man.  He made room for me and the others like me to exist in a world that drew lines so sharp that we were cut off.  Not only did he make room- he invited me in to a wider place- with light and life and hope.  My wife, Amy, received word of the passing of the Reverend David Bridgeman only a few weeks ago, though he left for home back in August.

David, on one of his many trips to southwestern China.  This photo hangs on my living room wall.

I know woefully little of his personal story.  I know that he was born in China to missionary parents- and he was always drawn back to that land, returning as often as he could to share the God that he loved wth the people that he loved.  He delighted to share stories and photos and artifacts of the land and people of south western China whenever I saw him.   

Always an old man to my eyes- older by at least a decade than i am now (42) when I first encountered him nearly 30 years ago.  His prayers were beautiful and rich, authentic and long.  I respected them, though my tired teenage body would often nod then lurch back awake in my pew before he finished.  He possessed both ancient wisdom and childlike awe with genuine humility.  His old blue hatchback was a persistent reminder of his values.  It was a solitary and quiet voice amongst the ostentatious suv’s and sedans in the church parking lot, not unlike Colombo’s oxidized Peugeot.

detail of the crucifixion from The Issenheim Altarpiece by Matthias Gruenwald

We shared a love for Gruenwald’s unparalleled Issenheim Altarpiece, and especially the figure of John the Baptist, of which he would speak with a beautiful passion.  It could bring us both to tears.  He once bought for me a reproduction of the closed state of the altar, featuring the crucifixion, from a seminary in China.  Framed and on my wall with its captions in Chinese characters, it is more than a relic of my favorite painting, but of mentorship, friendship, and of a man whose embrace circled the globe.  

I have long considered David one of my painting teachers.  When I came home on break from art school in Kansas City, I would bring the paintings I was working on with me so that he could see them.  He would prop a picture up on a chair in his office and look at it in silence.  Then after a while he would start to speak about what he was seeing.  He would go through every detail and talk about what it made him think about- how he saw it relating to God’s story.  As a spiritual painter in a secular school, I had no shortage of technical conversations about composition and color and line, but nobody would touch the spiritual implications with a ten foot pole.  David could talk about the formal aspects of art, but he would dive right into the symbolism and wouldn’t come up for an hour.  When he did he had more associations and story from a picture I painted than I had ever imagined could be in there, and I was the one who painted it.  He helped lay a foundation for a core belief I hold about painting; being a deeply poetic visual language that always caries more information than what the artist intended.  At my best, I am an apprentice/collaborator with the Holy Spirit, and any viewer might hold keys into the symbolism of my work that I hadn’t seen before.  This dynamic has become one of the things I treasure most about making art:  learning from the insights of the audience about what is really in there.  It is a big part of being a student in the School of the Transfer of Energy.      

upper panel of the Miracle of the Loaves and Fishes

David and His wife Mary waited patiently, over five years, for the painting they had requested.  I had free reign and it took quite a while before I felt I had a fitting subject.  On one of my repeated visits to the Loretta Chapel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in a dark corner far above and to the right of the altar is a painting of a fish resting on top of a loaf of bread.  I had never noticed it before- but it captivated me now.  I loved the simplicity and power of the image- so straightforward in the story it was referencing, the miracle of Jesus feeding the five thousand.  Soon afterwards as I contemplated the image and how I might approach it, I was reading Thor Heyerdahl’s account of his and his countryman’s pacific voyage to the Polynesian Islands from South America on a Balsa log raft named Kon-Tiki.  I was struck (as were the sailors) by the almost miraculous provision of flying fish that helped to feed them on their long journey.  From that day the flying fish became a new symbol for me of God’s unexpected provision.  It became the centerpiece for David’s painting.

I wish my account of David wasn’t so self-centered.  But I knew him through his self-less investments into me and my family.  He also sponsored my wife Amy through her own ordination process.  I am grateful for all that I have received from God through David.  The greatest honor I can give him is to say truthfully that he was like John the Baptist in our painting, always pointing and crying “behold! the Lamb of God who comes to take away the sins of the world!”    

The Reverend Jason Carter, who also grew up under David’s mentorship has written a much more fitting and beautiful remembrance of David here.

The Sacred Process

The Sacred Process

Is labor a sacrament?  The invitation of the Eighth Day?  A sacred collaboration with the living God?  I can’t help but to note that the call to labor in the garden came before the curse of toil.  I am certain that labor is about more than just earning my bread.  There is something deeper there, not just for the artist, but for the ditch digger and the roofer, the farmer and the nurse.  “Whatever you think, it’s more than that…”  ISB.

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Mule Resophonic Witness

I recently completed work on the handmade certificate of authenticity for Mule Resophonic Guitars, shipping him the first Batch this past week.  I hope you enjoy the finished piece and a few photos of the printing process.

Mule Resophonic Witness, 2018 linocut, printed with sepia ink on French’s paper

The block after numerous printings becomes a beautiful object.

The first batch of prints sent off to Matt Eich, now to be included with every guitar he and his team build, including the name of the customer and the number of the guitar written in the banners at the bottom of the print.

inking the block

Tthe trusty and bespattered 4″ speedball brayer.

A detail of the inked block.

Registering the paper on the block and press bed using a simple jig.

The delicate task of lifting the print from the block post printing.

print and block side by side

Examining the proof for flaws

The much reworked original drawing of the design.