Come With a Stone Tree

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16 Comments on “Come With a Stone Tree

  1. You see art everywhere! Wonderful! The cloud photo is spectacular.

    • Thank you for commenting, Don. It is good to hear from you. Spring always arrives with great companies of thunderheads, and this was the first of the season.

  2. Jack,
    Wow, Amazing as always!!!!! Really can’t wait for spring, eleven fresh inches of snow today. I’ll ski and be happy!!!!! I’m thiking about buying a camera, what do you use?

    • Thank you James. I use a Nikon D3200 with a Nikor 40mm micro/macro lens. I am very happy with it.

  3. Holy smokes, that was a pretty post! I love seeing all that green life and flowers sprouting up out of the earth. Great depth of feild and colors in your photos. Also, that storm cloud is ridiculously mighty looking. That Kansas spring weather…! Hope you are well, my friend.

    • Field! Depth of field, like feeled or feeled of vision. Field.

      • Absolutely beautiful Jack! Are you going to cut some threads? Or is that a weapon your making to thwart off spring fever? Your stone work is very neat too, quite the young mans sport!!
        David

      • Thanks David. Thanks for commenting. I don’t feel like a young man after moving those rocks and wielding that saw all day. The “weapon” is a little experimental scraper I fashioned to texture the inside of a wooden bowls. It seemed to work ok for that purpose. I’ll try it out on spring fever and see if it subdues it. How is that banjo coming along?

    • Thanks Mikey. Tis the season of the mighty Cumulonimbus, and the big winds. Well it is always the season of big winds in Kansas, but spring is just that much more intense. Thanks for clarifying about the “depth of field” typo. I thought you might be using some obscure artist’s dialect. How is the weather in Burma?

      • Kansas is the home of the Wind with a capital W. The weather here is really, really hot. It’s Songkran, the Thai water festival right now. Which means I have stuck inside my room for days as whenever you go out you get assaulted with buckets of water. Which sounds fun, I know…

  4. Life in so many manifestations. Small, expansive, colourful, lined, furrowed, springing, man you’ve got it all while inventing, nurturing, designing, documenting. Those lined hands say it all. Those hands could be anywhere on earth where planting is happening. They remind me of Africa ten thousand years ago. What a beautiful collection of images.

    • Thank you, Steven. I am honored by your words just like I usually am. Of Africa… we have been of the earth for a mighty long time, and in-spite of everything we still coax our provision from the dirt.

  5. Fire in the earth, fire in the sky… great massive clouds, stone-like hands and stones on the ground. I sat and looked at each and every picture for so long, drinking it all in. What beauty 🙂 And what are those beautiful tiny red seeds? Seeing another post from you was such a welcome to my day!

    • Hi, Bev. I am glad that you like the photographs. It is a good trade then, I hope, for the sense of awe that I get from yours. Those are alfalfa seeds, inoculated with microbes (rhizobium meliloti) that helps the roots to affix nitrogen into the soil. They were pre inoculated and the coating made them red. I was mixing some fresh inoculant in.

  6. Beautiful, Jack. I always love the images I find here of endeavour and good husbandry coupled with an appreciation of what results from both. Here in Wales I’ve been watering the young trees planted a month or so ago, and marvelling at tender leaves springing from wood. (Hawthorn, cherry, plum, walnut and witch hazel.) I love this season best of all.

    • Thank you, Clive. Good trees, you have planted, all around. We planted some young ones here a while back too. It is a wonder and a marvel. -I borrow that line from Knut Hamsun’s book Growth of the Soil. It is fitting in the context of growing things- and worthy of celebration. I too enjoyed the pictures of your own garden, really magnificent, of which you posted recently.

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