Brought Low

Working for and in collaboration with my friend, Cody, we have been preparing waney-edged planks and slabs of eastern red cedar and black walnut for loft and stair railings and countertops, while making much fodder for the compost pile.

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17 Comments on “Brought Low

  1. Beautiful work on the butterfly keys! Nice to see the Alaska mill in action too. I have never seen the use of straps to hold the guideboard down before though, but what a great idea. What do you do when you get near the end of the cut and strap is in the way of the saw? Do you simply move the strap back so it’s behind the saw, do you just stop the cut and lop off the last couple feet of the log, or . . . ?

    • Thank you, Dan. I do just move the straps around to complete the cut. This one was especially tricky because the 25′ log was more than twice the length of my 10′ piece of aluminum c-channel that I use as a guide. I had to move it three times during the first cut so we set up blocks at intervals along the log, parallel to the plane I wanted to cut, spaced so I could catch them as I slid the guide bar. The cut turned out much out better than I expected.

    • Thank you, Steven. It is a close call on some days, whether I smell more like sheep or the aromatic red cedar:)

  2. Hi Jack – two scrappy puppeteers inspired by the work and creativity seen on your blog – maybe we can take a visit to your farm one day? Learn a bit about wood carving?

    • Thank you, Ali(?). I like your identification as “scrappy puppeteers”. It conjures up a lot of amusing images. I am glad to welcome visitors, and to share what I can.

  3. Jack– You are really taking some beautiful photos these days. I love the colors of the wood shavings and dust. It’s so pure looking, like powered paint pigments. Also, Obie’s pilot in a plane? It’s amazing. But what is the rope for?

    • Thanks Mikey. There is one photo where the sawdust on the bench has a nice gradation as it goes from red to whitish yellow back to red as the saw passed through a section of sapwood. I assume the rope is to swing the airplane to make it fly. He actually made it for a boy on his bus, so I haven’t seen it in action.

      • That’s sweet of him that he made it for another kid. I noticed that beautiful gradation in the photo… love those images!

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