Trestle Table in Black Walnut

I delivered this table to my client’s office last week. It is good to finish a piece and be able to celebrate it. In spite of this I tend to experience a wide range of emotions and second guessing when I finish a job. One thing that never changes though is the gratitude I feel at the opportunity to be a woodworker, one who engages the authentic witness of the trees. They always have a real story to tell about our God and His majesty and faithfulness.

Big Horn Tables in Winfield Walnut

Last year, in collaboration with Crosstimbers Woodworking, we designed and built a series of coffee tables and end tables for the Big Horn River Lodge in Montana.  Most of the walnut was salvaged from the rejected timber from the logging of a farm in Winfield, Kansas.  Photographer Steve Hebert traveled to the lodge and captured some beautiful images of the tables for us.

The Sacred Process

Is labor a sacrament?  The invitation of the Eighth Day?  A sacred collaboration with the living God?  I can’t help but to note that the call to labor in the garden came before the curse of toil.  I am certain that labor is about more than just earning my bread.  There is something deeper there, not just for the artist, but for the ditch digger and the roofer, the farmer and the nurse.  “Whatever you think, it’s more than that…”  ISB.

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The Champion Table

After about five months the Champion Table is finished and in its new home outside of Chicago.  The woods in this table are Kansas Black Walnut and White Oak (the base uses oak from Kansas, the top uses oak of lesser known origin, beyond my friend, the lumber man), the top features also a small amount of Ebony and sulfur.  The design is original, and evolved throughout the building process.  Central, is a crucifixion theme and the arc.  There are other symbolic elements as well, throughout.  I am deeply grateful to the Champion family for the opportunity to build a significant piece of furniture for their home and living.  I am also humbled and thankful for all the encouragement I have received throughout the building process.  Ultimately I am glad in my heart, laboring to make something that celebrates the goodness of God.

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Walnut Long Table

The following are a series of photos of the construction of what I have chosen to call a “walnut long table”, featuring a large center cut black walnut slab about 2″ thick from Fall River, KS.   The legs are also black walnut from Boaz, KS.

Butterfly sockets along the seasoning check.

Removing material for a large sliding dovetail and dado for the cross brace.

Sawing the slope inside of the dovetail-dado (dovetail bit in router not deep enough).

Legs.

Fitting the legs.  Lower right is a view of the end of the sliding-dovetail on the brace.

Settled on steel bolts over mating the legs to the brace with another sliding dovetail.

View from the “South” end of the table.

From the “North”.

Studio Easel

Below is a series of photos of a new counterbalanced studio easel in quarter-sawn red oak, white oak and black walnut.  The two cooperative disciplines of  painting and woodworking meet in a special way.

The easel consists of a base, a frame which tilts forward and back, and a counter-balanced carriage which holds the painting and slides up and down on the frame.

Some of the carvings on various parts of the easel.

The base and frame in the shop.  Primary joinery is mortise and tenon for all of the components.

The carriage frame.

Haunched tenon of the carriage frame.

Chamfering the tilt-slides with a spokeshave.

“NEW LIFE” carving on the top rail of the frame.

Roman “V” carving on the central stile of the carriage frame.

Counter-balanced using pulleys, rope and 50 pounds of weights, allows the painting to be easily moved up and down without using any type of stops or knobs to hold the carriage in place..

Holding the Thomas panel.